Custard Apple

The custard apple, or cherimoya, is a medium sized, green, heart shaped tropical fruit that grows abundantly on trees.  With its green color and a scaly, bumpy texture, the outer skin resembles reptile skin.  The inner flesh is typically creamy white with large, dark seeds.  The flavor is complex, pleasantly sweet - reminiscent of bannana/strawberry/pineapple custard.  Delicious!

The shape, texture and color of both the skin and the flesh differ quite a bit according to the variety.  The flesh is sometimes quite pink.

Common Varieties: 
Benque; Caledonia; Canul; Chonox; San Pablo; Sarteneja; Tikal
When in season: 
early-spring
spring
late-spring
early-summer
winter
late-winter
How to select: 

The custard apple should have a pleasant fragrance. The flesh should give slightly when squeezed with your hand, similar to an avocado. The fruit may be purchased hard and ripened on the counter or in a bag for a couple of days.

How to eat: 

Simply cut the cherimoya in half and scoop out the flesh.  Remove the seeds because they are not edible. 

Native to: 

The tropical Andes, South America

Comments: 

The season for this fruit depends on your locality.  The season mentioned above is for cherimoya trees grown in California.  I personally live in the Central American tropics and the season for me is different.

Serving Size: 
One Pound
Nutritional Highlights: 

The cherimoya is a good source of Vitamin B6 and Potassium, and a very good source of Vitamin C.

Caloric Ratio %
Carbs: 
89
Proteins: 
6
Fats: 
5