acidic

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /usr/local/share/drupal-6.38/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

Currant

Currants are small, tart  berries with a black, white or red color that are found in abundance throughout northern Europe and Asia.  They grow on small, hardy, thornless shrubs. 

The United States imposed a ban on their farming in the early part of the 20th century, stil in effect in some states, due to fears of a plant disease that they believed would hurt the logging industry.  Because several states lifted the ban in 2003, curants are making a small comeback in the States.

Common Varieties: 
  • Red: Jonkheer van Tets; Perfection; Red Lake; Wilder
  • White:  Weisse aus Juterbog; White Imperial; White Versailles;
  • Pink: Gloire des Sablons
  • Black: Blacksmith; Boskoop Giant; Noir de Bourgogne; Wellington XXX; Willoughby

There are also a few varieties that are a cross between the currant and the gooseberry; Jostaberry; Crandall and Buffalo currants

 

 

When in season: 
late-spring
early-summer
summer
late-summer
How to select: 

There are red, black and white currents. They are ripe when they have fully achieved their color and are soft to the touch. Do not harvest until fully ripened.

How to eat: 

Because of their tart nature, currants do well when combined with sweeter fruits in fruit salads.  They also pair well with savory dishes in moderation.

Serving Size: 
1 Cup
Nutritional Highlights: 

Currants are a good source of Potassium and Manganese, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin C and Vitamin K.

 
Caloric Ratio %
Carbs: 
89
Proteins: 
8
Fats: 
3

Cranberry

The cranberry's color is so beautiful and unique to itself that not only does the word designate the fruit, but it also designates its color.  Dark red in color with just a tinge of violet, the small, beautiful berries grown on a vining perineal shrub that grows across the northern regions of the United States and Canada. 

When in season: 
early-fall
fall
late-fall
early-winter
How to select: 

Cranberries should be very firm to the touch. When squeezed it should be as hard as a rock. The color should be a bright red, fire engine color. Fruit that is lighter or darker than this is unripe. Ripe cranberries should also bounce. If they do not bounce then they are over-ripe.

How to eat: 

Cranberries are extremely bitter by nature, so to be palatable to humans they must be sweetened.  However, it is quite scrumptious in flavor to sweeten with other fruits, such as sweet tangerines.  Crush or grind the cranberries other fruits to make an extremely spectacular cranberry sauce.

Native to: 

Eastern North America (one of only three fruits native to North America)

Medicinal uses: 
  • Cranberries contain proanthocyanidins (PACs) that is related to their ability to prevent unrinary tract infections by blocking the ability of bacteria to attactch itself to the urinary tract lining.
  • Cranberries also help to prevent stomach ulcers.  Stomach ulcers are related to bacterial overgrowth of the stomach lining.  Again, cranberries help to prevent the ability of the bacteria to attach itself to the lining of the stomach.
  • Cranberries are known to prevent cancers of the breast, colon, lung, and prostate by triggerring the programmed cell death of cancer toumors.

 

Serving Size: 
One cup cranberries
Nutritional Highlights: 

Cranberries are a good source of Vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol) and Vitamin K, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin C and Manganese.

 
Caloric Ratio %
Carbs: 
89
Proteins: 
3
Fats: 
8

Blackberry

The blackberry is botanically not a true berry, rather it is a aggregate fruit, which is a cluster of small fruits developed from separate ovaries within a single flower.  It's a plump fruit with skin of a deep violet-black color.  The size of each fruit ranges from 1/2 inch to an inch, a perfect size for popping into the mouth for a burst of flavor that ranges from sweet to tart.

When in season: 
spring
late-spring
early-summer
summer
How to select: 

Blackberries do not ripen once picked, so the deeply colored ones are the sweetest and most flavorful. Look for the plumpest, shiniest and blackest berries possible. Store them in the refrigerator and use them as quickly as possible.

How to eat: 

No preparation is necessary in order to eat the blackberry.  It can simply be plucked from the bush and popped into the mouth to be enjoyed.

History: 

Blackberries have been used in Europe for more than 2,000 years for both eating and medicine. 

Nutritional Highlights: 

A good source of iron and vitamin C.

Syndicate content